Run for Hope is back!

Hello runners!

Don’t say bojio, Run for Hope 2018 is back!

Next year’s run also marks our 25th year anniversary, and we hope to see you join us once again to raise funds for cancer research.

RFH logo special edition

Keep your eyes and ears open because a run registration link will open soon! Start gathering your buddies and we hope to have you join us for this meaningful cause!

More details very soon.. we promise!

Stay tuned HOLDING BLUE

Father of 5 draws strength from his wife

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Kelvin Choo with his wife and 5 boys, aged 2 to 10. They were also ambassadors of Run For Hope 2016.

Kelvin Choo – father of five boys aged 2 to 10 – is a cancer survivor who draws his strengths from his family, especially his dedicated wife.

Read on to learn more about his story as our Run For Hope 2017 ambassador.

  1. When were you diagnosed and at what age?

I was diagnosed in 2012 with stage 3 colon cancer. I was aged 47 then.

  1. How did you find the strength to go through the treatments?

Seeing my wife tending to the family, her work and looking after me during my recuperation gave me the strength that I should not give up on my treatment, but to look forward to each day. I felt that I should not let her shoulder the burden herself.

  1. What did friends or family members do or say that meant the most to you?

Friends and family members were very supportive on my road to recovery by reassuring me that medical sciences are very advanced in treating this illness. They also helped me by taking on my work when I went for treatment.

  1. Can you share anything about donating to the Run For Hope cause?

I am running this Run For Hope 2017 for my father who lost the battle in 2016, and for all those who are still receiving treatment. My message to them is that they should not give up – press on!


Kelvin and his family will be participating in Run For Hope 2017. Join him and thousands of other survivors to raise awareness and support for cancer research at http://tinyurl.com/zn6kqyd.

Mother of 3: Her Battle with Thyroid Cancer

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Sylvia and her family are banning together in the battle against cancer.

Receiving news of her diagnosis just one week after her youngest son’s birthday was a blow to Sylvia Ong’s life. The writer and 35-year-old mother of 3 told us what motivated her in her battle, and how she overcame it.

  1. When were you diagnosed and at what age?

I was diagnosed with papillary thyroid carcinoma in October 2014 – just a week after I celebrated my youngest and third child’s first birthday. I was 33 at the time.

  1. What was your first reaction when you were told that you had cancer?

I couldn’t believe my ears. I kept thinking the doctor was going to tell me that he made a mistake somewhere. Because how was that possible? Me – cancer? There was no pain, no symptoms, nothing, and furthermore, I was still breastfeeding my child at the time.

  1. How did you find the strength to go through the treatments?

It was definitely my mum and my three kids, I wanted to be well for them again. Also, my doctor was very encouraging, as he kept telling me that thyroid cancer is the best cancer to have. There was a high chance of making a full recovery, and there was no need for chemotherapy since it doesn’t react to it, and it was just a surgery to worry about.

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Sylvia will be participating in Run For Hope 2017. Join her and thousands of other survivors to raise awareness and support for cancer research at http://tinyurl.com/zn6kqyd.

Struck by a rare cancer in my 30s

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Judy Anthony, Late 30s
Senior Enrolled Nurse
Singapore National Eye Centre

A loving mom, a dedicated nurse, a fighter.

  1. When were you diagnosed and at what age?

I was diagnosed with Stage 3 Fallopian tube cancer in 2014. I consulted my gynecologist about a painful sensation in my left abdomen which pain killers could not relieve.

  1. What was your first reaction when you were told that you had cancer?

It was a big shock to me as my family has no history with cancer or other illnesses. My cancer was rare in Singapore and I required surgery and chemo therapy. At first I didn’t want to go for any treatment as I feared the side effects of chemo.

  1. How did you find the strength to go through the treatments?

I was lucky to enjoy the support of my family and close friends who gave me the assurance to commence the treatment. They were very supportive – always calling and messaging me just to ask if I was ok. During ‘good weeks’ when I was feeling well, I would meet up with my friends for a meal and catch up with them. This made me feel like life was still normal.

  1.    What did friends or family members do or say that meant the most to you?

Cancer was easier to deal with compared to being bald and feeling ugly. That was so tough to deal with. My family and friends would always tell me I still looked the same. They bought me scarfs and presents to brighten my day. When I was almost at the end of my chemo I experienced memory loss and it was scary not to even know my address or NRIC number. As such, my 16 year-old daughter would make sure I was never alone as even counting money was difficult. My friends would also offer to fetch and send me back to ensure my safety.

When I came back to work, my hair was so short but my bosses and colleagues were so kind and told me it was cool. In addition, as a nurse, it was almost impossible to avoid being exposed to infectious cases. But they would look out for me by volunteering to take over.

  1. What are the things you are able to do now as a result for winning the battle against cancer?

Looking back at my journey I am truly blessed to have good support from family, friends and the cancer group. It’s been two years since I was diagnosed and each day is a blessing to me. I want to live my life to the fullest and be a role model to those who have cancer.

  1. Can you share anything about donating to the Run For Hope cause?

I took part in my first Run For Hope last year and promised I would run every year. I was further encouraged to be a better nurse and help those in need. I make an extra effort to eat healthy and have a good balance between work and play.

Even though I am a nurse, the battle was tough. The fear of pain and death was constantly on my mind, and no one should suffer alone. To combat loneliness, I attended parties and feel good make up sessions. All these would not have been possible without the kind donations. I truly believe that every dollar donated would make someone feel better.

Thank you for this opportunity. I hope to raise awareness and help others.

Judy will be participating in Run For Hope 2017. Join her and thousands of other survivors to raise awareness and support for cancer research at http://tinyurl.com/zn6kqyd.

13 with skin cancer

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Photo credit: Photographer Dave Poh

23-year-old skin cancer survivor Mr Goh Chang Teck, had brushes with the disease since a young age of 13. We ask him how he felt upon hearing the diagnosis, and the things he is able to enjoy today as a result of winning the battle against cancer.

  1. When were you diagnosed and at what age?

As a Primary 5 student in 2005, strange sores and eruptions appeared all over my body, but I thought they were normal. It wasn’t until 2 years later at the age of 13 that I was diagnosed with Mycosis Fungoides and Pityriasis Lichenoides – both are forms of skin cancers that affects the lymph nodes. Over time, the sores and developed into fungus-like clusters of dried, reddish and scaly skin. These appeared mostly on my legs, coupled with white spots that appeared on my upper body.

Nevertheless, life carried on and I was thankful to be able to do everything normally, like everyone my age. But in 2013, two months prior to enlisting in the army, I was re-diagnosed with the above mentioned conditions. This time, however, I had progressed from Stage 1 to Stage 2A.

  1. What was your first reaction when you were told that you had cancer?

When the doctors finally broke the news that I was indeed suffering from cancer, my first reaction was: “Why me of all people?” I was lost, disgusted, disappointed, and guilty.

Lost because everything I planned before graduating from polytechnic had all gone down the drain. Disgusted because I couldn’t take it in my stride my body looked and felt this way. Disappointed because I wouldn’t be able to serve National Service, and be judged by people around me for not having done so. And finally, guilty, because I had to be another burden to my parents when I could have signed on upon enlisting in the army.

But all was not lost, because I had hope. I found strength in my family and close friends, who constantly gave words of encouragement and physical and emotional support during moments when I felt the treatments weren’t working out well. You get a heightened sense of gratefulness when you realise the extent that some people would go to just to see you happy and strong!

  1. What are the things you are able to do now as a result for winning the battle against cancer?

I wouldn’t say that I have won the battle against cancer because I am simply fighting a battle in which I am stronger. I’m taking every opportunity to make sure that I have a constant advantage over my worst enemy, such as my friends and family. On that note, I’m still doing the things that I love to do, such as running. But more importantly, I am able to spend time with my loved ones!

  1. Can you share anything about donating to the Run For Hope cause?

I think about donations the same way you think about sharing good things like delicious snacks and lobangs! I believe that if you are able to spend two hours walking around shopping malls to shop for the latest deals, you can similarly challenge yourself with a new fitness goal by starting out with a 10km run-walk at Run For Hope 2017 while contributing to cancer research!

Chang Teck will be participating in Run For Hope 2017. Join him and thousands of other survivors to raise awareness and support for cancer research at http://tinyurl.com/zn6kqyd.

Cancer was the best thing that happened to me

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Ms Kate Wong, a 75-year-old breast cancer survivor and a dragon boater of the Pink Spartans dragon boat team cancer support group, shares about her brush with cancer and how she transformed the ordeal into opportunity.

  1. When were you diagnosed and at what age?

I was diagnosed on 14 Jan 2002. I was 61 then.

  1. What was your first reaction when you were told that you had cancer?

I was a kindergarten school principal when I got the news. Naturally, I was a bit shock as I was so busy in my education career and wasn’t aware of cancer and its symptoms.

Fortunately, I was diagnosed at the first stage. It was by chance during a mammogram when a surgeon discovered that I had lumps in my breasts.

A one-hour biopsy examination revealed that I had aggressive breast cancer. Though the cancer was in its first stage, I decided to undergo a mastectomy surgery, which is the surgical removal of the entire breast. I thought it was better to lose my breast than to lose my life.

After the surgery, I went through four cycles of chemo, and then five years of hormonal therapy.

  1. What are the things you are able to do now as a result for winning the battle against cancer?

I think cancer is the best thing that ever happened to me.

It helped me decide to quit my stressful job to stop and smell for the roses. It gave me the opportunity to meet other cancer survivors and take up fulfilling activities such dragon boating with the Pink Spartans, an activity I am still active in.

There is life after breast cancer. Personally, I enjoyed the camaraderie of meeting and befriending other cancer survivors. It also motivated me to exercise via gymming and swimming. Today, I am still physically healthy and swim twice a week.

All these happened only after my cancer.

I am very thankful to the staff of National Cancer Centre Singapore. The doctors, nurses and support group helped me a lot.

Join her and thousands of other survivors to raise awareness and support for the cancer research at http://tinyurl.com/zn6kqyd.

Live Updates for Run For Hope 2016 – Stay Tuned!

Hi runners!

Stay tuned to this page for live updates on Run Day morning.

5am:
Good morning everyone!
It’s 2hr to Run For Hope and we’re looking forward to seeing all of you.

Don’t forget your running shoes, water bottle and a hand towel. Most importantly, don’t leave your smile at home!

Watch this space for updates throughout the day and see you soon :)


6am:
It’s 1hr to Run For Hope.
Weather is looking great and hopefully it stays that way.
Another 50mins before our GOH Mr Chee Hong Tat (Ministry of Health and Ministry of Communications and Information) arrives.
Do watch this space and also the Facebook for more updates!


6.45am:
Runners are congregating at the start point.
Do make your way there after dropping off your belongings!


7.00am:
‘Wefie’ taken with GOH Mr Chee Hong Tat.
Our celebrity ambassadors are ready to go for the SCDF & 10km run.


7.30am:
Executive challenge for the 3.5km and normal 3.5km fun run will begin shortly!


8.00am:
Runners return to Promontory!


8.30am:

  • Cool down session by Team Singapore and fitness trainer, Shane Kelly.
  • Executive Challenge prize presentation
  • Closing Speech by Chair, Run for Hope 2016
  • Run For Hope Trivia Questions and Stage Games

 

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